Jay Nelson: The Autonomous Zone

The Autonomous Zone
New Work by Jay Nelson
October 10 – November 9, 2008

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Jay Nelson’s drawings, paintings and sculpture are created as part of his quest for individual autonomy within the modern American landscape. His solo show at Triple Base Gallery pays homage to the long history of the Western frontier as a destination for a romantic solitary experience. Focusing on San Francisco’s Ocean Beach as his point of departure, Nelson will employ a range of media to explore his subject of inspiration.

While Nelson’s paintings and drawings imagine a utopian, psychedelic experience within the natural environment, his sculptures serve a dual function as both fine art and self-sustaining utilitarian objects. Previous sculptures have included site-specific treehouses, an energy-efficient car camper, compact “case studies” for travel, and most recently a motor scooter outfitted for exploration. Nelson’s sculptures are simultaneously useful tools to transport oneself into the sky, forest or ocean as well as an imaginative starting point for the venture into a place of pure experience.

Jay Nelson received his MFA from Bard College in 2008. His solo shows include Triple Base Gallery, San Francisco (2006 & 2007) and Space 868, Bolinas (2005). Selected group shows include Elizabeth Leach Gallery, Portland (2007); Milk Gallery, New York City (2007); Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco (2006); Samson Projects, Boston (2006); New Image Art, Los Angeles (2006); Oakland Museum of California, Oakland (2006); Kayo Gallery, Salt Lake City (2006); and Pulliam Defenbaugh Gallery, Portland (2006). Nelson was previously the curator of the Mollusk Surf Shop in San Francisco. Publications include The New York Times, ANP Quarterly, Blue Magazine, San Francisco Magazine, San Francisco Bay Guardian and L Magazine.

New York Times Article

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